Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Hair Iron


As my hair is getting longer, it has gotten unruly, because the curly part is pushing the straighten hair into the curly direction. So no longer a "fawhawk" but "out of bed". Its not that bad, but it gotten me thinking of getting a hair iron. Hair iron is just two pieces of heated plates that can go up to 210 degrees Celsius (water boils at 100 Celsius okay) and used to iron your hair flat. I used to have one, this really cheap ass iron, that is kinda scary to use, because I am afraid it might melt or electrocute me, but it really does work for my brother, I just don't know how to use it on my curly hair. Perhaps more YouTube videos would help me
 
This is brand new type whose iron actually rotates and while a pair of brushes, align your hair correctly.
 
This is the traditional ones with a ceramic plates.
 
 
 
As I was reading about the ceramic plates, I found out that ceramic plates naturally release negative ions. Negative ions is apparently very good to hair because it keeps it from going unruly. Some hair dryers also have negative ions built in it to prevent frowziness. Then it hit me. OMG, this is something from the Electrostatic show! We have this experiment in the Electrostatic show, that we never get to do often, because it requires a volunteer with dry loose movement hair. We take a balloon and rub it against the hair, the hair will stuck to balloon because we transfer all the positive charge from the balloon to the hair and the hair repels each other and sticks to the nearest thing with some negative charge which is the balloon
 
So bad hair day is caused by built up of static electricity in your hair, so those negative ions in hair irons and hair dryer will maintaining good hair.
 
 
 
You know what I thought, I was like, this could be a science show!, I could bring a hair iron on stage and casually iron my hair in front of the audience and pretend nothing is happening. Its so random and so strange but it helps me to explain the things in life that is related to static electricity. Okay... I think too much about work...
 
 
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